Want a Global Read Aloud Sticker?#GRA19

Note:  Make sure you fill in the form, please. Otherwise, I will not be able to email you with the instructions.

For many years, participants have asked for Global Read Aloud merchandise and while t-shirts and such have been available for a few years, I never ordered stickers. However, that has now changed. This spring I ordered a few stickers to hand out when I am at conferences but it turns out that many of you who I am not seeing would also like one.

So if you are someone who would like a sticker there are two options.  Either say hi at a conference or see me somewhere in the wild OR send me a self-addressed stamped envelope and I will send you one.  To see my home address, please fill out this form with your email address and I will send you my address.

I am limiting the requests to one sticker per person as I am paying for these out of my own pocket and not selling them. Once this batch is gone, I may order new ones, who knows.

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The Global Read Aloud and Literacy Curriculum

One of the most common questions, I receive in regard to the Global Read Aloud is how, and whether, it integrates into a pre-existing literacy curriculum. Is this project merely a fun add-on or is there actual academic value in it that can be defended in case it needs to be?

 

While there would be little wrong with the program if it was “just” a fun add-on, the answer is that; yes, the Global Read Aloud has academic value, and not just for the students, but for the teachers themselves as well. So let’s break it down a bit.

 

Because the program centers around a read aloud, that means you have a mentor text. Many participants use the text as their central text while they work through lessons on story development and analysis. Examples of this include: character analysis, inferring, theme analysis, working through challenging words. In fact, in looking through the Common Core Reading standards most are covered:

 

“Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.” Because the text is not only read aloud but also discussed with a worldwide audience, students are not only expected to understand the text but also be able to infer and formulate their opinions about the text in a way to effectively communicate with others.

“Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.” The whole notion of the read aloud is to understand the story, to predict what will happen, to discuss and share with others, and be able to hold the whole text in your mind while you continue to listen to the read aloud.

“Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.” Tracking the characters along with the story allows us to work on stamina, to work on long-term predictions, and to get to know the characters and story on a deeper level.

“Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.” In order to convey nuance, the read aloud often lends itself well to studying the craft of writing as seen through word choice and figurative meaning.

“Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.” One of the main points of the GRA is to dive into perspective, this does not only include the perspective of the narrators but also how our own perspective and lens impacts our understanding and experience with the text.

 

“Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.” Because there are additional tools layered in with the Global Read Aloud, such as author videos, student presentations, and other content created by students around the world, this is a natural extension of the learning.

“Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.” I love having my students discuss with others what they believe will happen in the story, as well as what the characters should do in order to stay within character. Diving deep into a character and then being able to articulate and argue one’s opinion is a vital skill.

“Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.” I always add in other sources and use the Global Read Aloud as a springboard into inquiry. Because the books chosen are often set in unfamiliar places or center around unfamiliar events, students naturally have a lot of questions. This is why the resource sharing is an incredibly powerful tool of the GRA.

 

This is just discussing the reading component, but the beauty of the GRA is that it is so much more than “just” reading. Coupling it with the collaborative global aspect offers us the opportunity for students to work on writing, on speaking and listening, on the act of collaboration itself, as well as meaningful technology integration. It allows us to focus on building an understanding of others, of developing empathy and activism. This is at the center of what great 21st-century learning looks like; providing authentic and meaningful ways to engage in a worldwide dialogue around relevant topics.

 

And for the teachers involved, it allows for new tools to be introduced, new connections to be forged that will bolster their teaching, as well as a meaningful way to dive into literacy that will model what literacy experiences should look like.

 

But don’t just take my word on it. I asked educators who have done the GRA to share how they integrated the project into their curriculum and here is what they said.

 

My district encourages the SAMR model for technology integration. Using technology to share ideas and collaborate with students from other parts of the country/world is a task that falls under the highest level of the SAMR model.

 

I use FlipGrid as a way to respond to the text while assessing speaking and listening standards, come to discussions prepared and adding to the discussion. I also assess postcards for adding media to support text. In addition to literacy, GRA really fits into our S.S. theme of world regions and cultures.

 

GRA works across all levels, promotes excellent collaboration, learning styles, communication, technology integration and global connections. The teacher has the flexibility to incorporate using standards/skills that he/she sees fit. I’ve shared about it only positively.

 

Refugee was a huge addition to my 7/8 curriculum last fall, and I’d wager that it was an experience that would be at the top of the list for what kids will remember from my class. We use a workshop model, largely, and so the chapters would be built in as model texts for minilessons in reading and writing workshop. We’d do quickwrites about character development, inferences, vocabulary in context, to name a few . . . Most important to me, however, was just the chance to share a terrific story and know it was also happening in classrooms around the world – so powerful!

 

We were asked this year to use a read aloud to model fluency and what a reader is thinking while they read. Our 6th graders seem to think letting the words pass through the eyeballs without going to the brain is sufficient, and we are trying to change that perception. Two of us could attest to its effectiveness due to GRA. We did Refugee this year and it opened up all sorts of thinking and discussion.

 

At the end of Refugee, I had them create one pagers, and I met individually to discuss questions related to the book and standards. For instance, what was the theme, how do you know, how did it develop through the story. What was your favorite scene and why was it important to the whole story. Really just took a look at State standards and created questions. Then, we followed up with self-selected research topics related to the story. Also, brought in non-fiction pairings to add to depth of topics.

 

It’s the epitome of 21st century skills – the kids have to communicate and collaborate with others around the world; they think critically about meaningful issues that impact their peers; they come up with creative projects and responses. They’re also highly engaged with a great text.all great things!! 

 

It lends itself SO well to standards and curriculum!! I teach 1-2 on a loop and did A Boy Called Bat and before that the BFG! Asks and answers questions for sure, technology (connecting with other classes), social studies and map skills (finding new friends on the map)….not to mention that they LOVE reading and get interested in authors and their other books!!!

 

I teach in South Africa and participated in GRA for the first time last year. It was the highlight of the year. Our school year starts in Jan and my present class have a countdown going for when they can start GRA. I integrated Refugee into all subjects I teach. The book became real and even more so with the global connections and sharing we made. 21st Century teaching is all about communication, collaboration and creative thinking. This is exactly what GRA does.

 

It is so important that students learn of different cultures in our ever changing world. We use the Lucy Calkin’s UOS for our literacy block. We read the book aloud as the read aloud time for the day and it reinforced the skills being taught in the workshop that dealt with social issues. We also hit so many listening and speaking goals by connecting through Flip Grid and Google Hangouts with a global audience for both. We learned about author’s trade through our weekly videos we watched made by the author. We wrote authentically with sharing our thoughts on Padlet and posting on social media under the guidance of our teachers and me the librarian. We gained knowledge and empathy for what people in other cultures across the world might experience through hyperdocs created by educators to be used to help us learn vocabulary and history about the culture of the people in the books we shared.

 

I’ve been able to integrate the picture books into the standards we’re teaching during that time. Since it’s so close to the beginning of the year, it’s your basic story elements.

 

And so, much like I have said before; why take the time to do the GRA? Global collaboration is necessary to show students that they are part of something bigger than them. That the world needs to be protected and that we need to care for all people. You can show them pictures of kids in other countries but why not have them speak to each other? Then the caring can begin.

 

To sign up for this year’s incredible project, go here. It kicks off September 30th!

Information for 2019 Global Read Aloud #GRA19

Time is ticking and the kick off to the 2019 Global Read Aloud is nearing.  I hope this collection of information is helpful!

For a comprehensive FAQ post, go here

The dates are September 30th – November 8th, 2019 –  you can fall behind, just don’t read ahead.

The books selected are:

Picture book study

yuyimorales_3.jpg

The work of Yuyi Morales – creator extraordinaire.  Every time I pick up a book shaped in some way by Yuyi, it takes my breath away.  The scope of her work means that we not only get to t revel in the beauty of her art but also marvel at the stories she shares.

1st week:

Dreamers in English or Spanish

2nd week:

Just A Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book

3rd week:

Nino Wrestles the World

4th week:

Viva Frida

5th week:

Little Night/Nochecita

6th week:  Your choice

Early Readers

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say by Angela Dominguez

Stella Diaz loves marine animals, especially her betta fish, Pancho. But Stella Diaz is not a betta fish. Betta fish like to be alone, while Stella loves spending time with her mom and brother and her best friend Jenny. Trouble is, Jenny is in another class this year, and Stella feels very lonely.

When a new boy arrives in Stella’s class, she really wants to be his friend, but sometimes Stella accidentally speaks Spanish instead of English and pronounces words wrong, which makes her turn roja. Plus, she has to speak in front of her whole class for a big presentation at school! But she better get over her fears soon, because Stella Díaz has something to say!

Middle Grade

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

Mia Tang has a lot of secrets.

Number 1: She lives in a motel, not a big house. Every day, while her immigrant parents clean the rooms, ten-year-old Mia manages the front desk of the Calivista Motel and tends to its guests.

Number 2: Her parents hide immigrants. And if the mean motel owner, Mr. Yao, finds out they’ve been letting them stay in the empty rooms for free, the Tangs will be doomed.

Number 3: She wants to be a writer. But how can she when her mom thinks she should stick to math because English is not her first language?

It will take all of Mia’s courage, kindness, and hard work to get through this year. Will she be able to hold on to her job, help the immigrants and guests, escape Mr. Yao, and go for her dreams?

Middle School

The Bridge Home by Padma Venkatraman

Life is harsh in Chennai’s teeming streets, so when runaway sisters Viji and Rukku arrive, their prospects look grim. Very quickly, eleven-year-old Viji discovers how vulnerable they are in this uncaring, dangerous world. Fortunately, the girls find shelter–and friendship–on an abandoned bridge. With two homeless boys, Muthi and Arul, the group forms a family of sorts. And while making a living scavenging the city’s trash heaps is the pits, the kids find plenty to laugh about and take pride in too. After all, they are now the bosses of themselves and no longer dependent on untrustworthy adults. But when illness strikes, Viji must decide whether to risk seeking help from strangers or to keep holding on to their fragile, hard-fought freedom.

Young Adult

The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline

Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden—but what they don’t know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.

 

The weekly schedule is:

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say 

Week 1:  Chapters 1-4

Week 2:  Chapters 5 – 7

Week 3:  Chapters 8 – 10

Week 4:  Chapters 11 – 13

Week 5:  Chapters 14 – 17

Week 6:  Chapters 18 – End

Thank you to Brittney Dougherty for doing the breakdown for me!

 

Front Desk:

Week 1: Chapters 1 – 9

Week 2: Chapters 10 – 21

Week 3: Chapters 22 – 35

Week 4: Chapters 36 – 48

Week 5: Chapters 49 – 57

Week 6: Chapters 58 – End

 

The Bridge Home:

Week 1:  Chapters 1-7

Week 2:  Chapters 8-15

Week 3:  Chapters 16-22

Week 4:  Chapters  23-30

Week 5:  Chapters 31-37

Week 6:  Chapters 38-44

 

The Marrow Thieves:

Week 1:  Pages 1-41

Week 2:  Pages 42-79

Week 3:  Pages 80 – 117

Week 4: Pages  118 – 160

Week 5: Pages 161 – 191

Week 6: Pages 192 – end

Facebook groups to connect with other educators:

Main GRA Facebook group

Picture Book Study Group

Early Reader Book Group

Upper Elementary/ Middle-Grade Book Group

Middle School Book Group

YA Book Group

Twitter hashtags for the year:

Picture book author study – #GRAYuyi

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say – #GRAStella

Front Desk – #GRAFront

The Bridge Home – #GRABridge

The Marrow Thieves– #GRAMarrow

Global Read Aloud Merchandise:

T-shirts and other merchandise supporting the project can be found here

Resource Sharing – add your ideas

Please remember and respect that the Global Read Aloud is trademarked and is established in the spirit of free collaboration.  Please do not create resources to sell for the project – it goes completely against the nature of the work and will result in you being barred from the project.

Do please share resources on this spreadsheet, make sure to not delete anything off it.  Also, please do not change the sharing settings on it.

To see the spreadsheet and add your own free resources, go here

Author Websites:

Yuyi Morales

Angela Dominguez

Kelly Yang

Padma Venkatraman

Cherie Dimaline

 

Global Read Aloud Choices 2019 #GRA19

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Global Read Aloud.  It is hard to believe that what started as such a small idea has grown into a truly global literacy initiative that has connected millions of kids throughout the year.  It is hard to believe that it has been ten years already.

Yesterday, I was asked what the Global Read Aloud means to me and I will admit, it was hard to answer the question.  Because in its truest form, the GRA is an invitation into a world that we can share together.  An invitation into a story that will shape our experience, that will help us speak books with one another in order for us to understand each other better.  Every year I see the connections being made and think of each of them as a small chip in the many walls that seem to surround us around the world, I see it as one more step toward a more empathetic, understanding, and activist society.

And so the books are at the center of it all which puts a lot of pressure on the selection of the texts.  Hitting publish on this post will once again mean me holding my breath, waiting for the reaction to unfold worldwide.  And yet, it also means that perhaps these books will change the way we think, the way we teach.  That these books and the creators behind them will become part of the language of books that we speak with our students.  I cannot wait for that to happen.

The books chosen this year were once again a combination of the winners of the voting rounds and my own selection.

So, starting on September 30th, what will we be reading aloud?

Picture book study

yuyimorales_3.jpg

The work of Yuyi Morales – creator extraordinaire.  Every time I pick up a book shaped in some way by Yuyi, it takes my breath away.  The scope of her work means that we not only get to t revel in the beauty of her art but also marvel at the stories she shares.

1st week:

Dreamers in English or Spanish

2nd week:

Just A Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book

3rd week:

Nino Wrestles the World

4th week:

Viva Frida

5th week:

Little Night/Nochecita

6th week:  Your choice

Early Readers

Stella Diaz Has Something to Say by Angela Dominguez

Stella Diaz loves marine animals, especially her betta fish, Pancho. But Stella Diaz is not a betta fish. Betta fish like to be alone, while Stella loves spending time with her mom and brother and her best friend Jenny. Trouble is, Jenny is in another class this year, and Stella feels very lonely.

When a new boy arrives in Stella’s class, she really wants to be his friend, but sometimes Stella accidentally speaks Spanish instead of English and pronounces words wrong, which makes her turn roja. Plus, she has to speak in front of her whole class for a big presentation at school! But she better get over her fears soon, because Stella Díaz has something to say!

Middle Grade

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

Mia Tang has a lot of secrets.

Number 1: She lives in a motel, not a big house. Every day, while her immigrant parents clean the rooms, ten-year-old Mia manages the front desk of the Calivista Motel and tends to its guests.

Number 2: Her parents hide immigrants. And if the mean motel owner, Mr. Yao, finds out they’ve been letting them stay in the empty rooms for free, the Tangs will be doomed.

Number 3: She wants to be a writer. But how can she when her mom thinks she should stick to math because English is not her first language?

It will take all of Mia’s courage, kindness, and hard work to get through this year. Will she be able to hold on to her job, help the immigrants and guests, escape Mr. Yao, and go for her dreams?

Middle School

The Bridge Home by Padma Venkatraman

Life is harsh in Chennai’s teeming streets, so when runaway sisters Viji and Rukku arrive, their prospects look grim. Very quickly, eleven-year-old Viji discovers how vulnerable they are in this uncaring, dangerous world. Fortunately, the girls find shelter–and friendship–on an abandoned bridge. With two homeless boys, Muthi and Arul, the group forms a family of sorts. And while making a living scavenging the city’s trash heaps is the pits, the kids find plenty to laugh about and take pride in too. After all, they are now the bosses of themselves and no longer dependent on untrustworthy adults. But when illness strikes, Viji must decide whether to risk seeking help from strangers or to keep holding on to their fragile, hard-fought freedom.

Young Adult

The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline

Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden—but what they don’t know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.

 

There you have it; another amazing year of connecting awaits.  Read the books, share the books, and get ready for another opportunity to make the world smaller.

PS:  If you still need to sign up, please go here.

Vote now for Global Read Aloud 2019 Books #GRA19

I can’t believe that it is the 10th time I get to put out the call to vote for books.  That this little project has been around for that long.  That this year will be the tenth time, millions of kids around the world get to read a book aloud together.

Every year I am not sure that we can find books and creators as amazing as the year prior and yet here we are; another set of incredible work to choose from,

There are a few things that mark a Global Read Aloud choice:

  • It is a well-written book, that also works as a read aloud, that will garner worldwide conversations, developing empathy, understanding, and deeper compassion for others.
  • The length is manageable for 6 weeks of read aloud – this is a huge part and this is often where many amazing books don’t make the cut.
  • It has not been used before in the project.
  • It is widely accessible to people around the world.
  • I try to focus on own voices authors as well.

Voting will start today and run a week.  I am hoping to make the announcement of the chosen books and creators the first week of April.

I know there are books that I have missed, there always is, I try to read as many as I can, I also try to find as many as I can that would be great picks. I hope you love the ones in the running, I know I do.

Celebrate the Release of Bat and the End of Everything!

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For the 2018 Global Read Aloud, thousands of kids around the world fell in love with Bat and his skunk in the incredible book, A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold.  Imagine my sheer delight when Elana reached out to me to ask if I would mind celebrating the release of the third book in the series with her.  Absolutely!  Then imagine my even bigger delight and surprise when she said she would love to give away three free Skype visits in order to celebrate the book’s release.  So for the month of March, this giveaway will be open to the world.  Please read on to see how to enter.

On March 26, BAT AND THE END OF EVERYTHING will enter the world!

BoyCalledBat3.jpeg

Here is more about the book:

The third book in the funny and joyful series Katherine Applegate has called “tender and
important,” by National Book Award finalist Elana K. Arnold. 

Bixby Alexander Tam (nicknamed Bat) has been the caretaker for Thor, the best skunk kit in the world…but the last day of third grade is quickly approaching, and Thor is almost ready to be released into the wild.

The end of school also means that Bat has to say good-bye to his favorite teacher, and he worries about the summer care of Babycakes, their adorable class pet. Not only that, but his best friend is leaving for a long vacation in Canada.
Summer promises good things, too, like working with his mom at the vet clinic and hanging out with his sister, Janie. But Bat can’t help but feel that everything is coming to an end.

National Book Award finalist Elana K. Arnold returns with the third story starring an
unforgettable boy on the autism spectrum.

Bringing Bat to the page over three books has been a joy. Greater still has been the joy of
connecting with kids who love Bat and Thor, his skunk kit.

To celebrate the publication of BAT AND THE END OF EVERYTHING, I’m giving away
three free Skype visits!
I want to thank everyone who has read the BAT books and shared them with kids, including
Pernille Ripp whose Global Read Aloud helped many more kids meet Bixby Alexander Tam.

Please enter the drawing, tell a friend about the BAT books, and cuddle an animal friend.
With Love,
Elana

To enter the drawing, simply enter in your information on this form and stay tuned.  Winners will be drawn on March 26th!

An Open Letter to Global Read Aloud Participants from Aisha Saaed

Whenever I choose a book for the GRA, I hold my breath for a long time.  Will the people who read it aloud get why I chose it?  Will they see the beauty?  The possibility of understanding?   The connections between themselves and others whose lives may seem so different?  The books chosen this year once again allowed people to step into a culture that many had not experienced.  To cheer for a girl who seemed to face impossible circumstances and yet trusted herself to make a difference.  To understand a boy who in the end just wanted to be himself.  To hold our breath for three refugees as the world turned against them, to understand a girl’s path to adulthood when the world only sees her through one part of an identity.  To dive into the indigenious culture and see it for its beauty and its presence all around us.

To the authors and illustrators of these books, in sharing your words with us, you allowed us to share our words with the world, and that means that the world has now changed.  I cannot thank you enough for creating these books because while the Global Read Aloud may be coming to a close, for us all, these books and their stories have provided us with something bigger – a beginning.  And for that, I will forever be grateful.

Aisha Saeed, the author of Amal Unbound, wrote the following thank you.

Dear Teachers,

When I was eight years old my mother packed me leftovers for my school lunch: keema with roti. Children teased me mercilessly in the cafeteria. They scrunched their noses and pretended to gag at the sight of the unfamiliar food.

During the Global Read Aloud you ordered samosas, pakoras, jalebis, chai, and full Pakistani feasts for your children to sample. I saw a picture of a South Asian child sharing with pride the roti they had for lunch with their class.

When I was ten years old I ran into kids from school while my family and I were at the grocery store. We were on our way to a dinner party and dressed in our finest shalwar kamiz. For weeks after, children poked and prodded me about the “strange” costumes.

During the Global Read Aloud I watched parents visit your classrooms in shalwar kamiz to share their Pakistani culture. I saw photos and videos of children wearing their ancestral clothing, standing before their classrooms as they discussed the beautiful outfits of South Asia.

When I was twelve years old, I went to school the day after Eid with deep orange henna still on my hands from the holiday. Children shrieked and pretended my hands were diseased. Despite my explanations, they refused to sit next to me until the color at last faded from my hands.

During the Global Read Aloud, you discussed henna, you brought them into classrooms. You celebrated the tradition and children decorated one another’s hands.

All through my elementary school years, I was taunted for my identity. And yet I couldn’t hide from who I was. My skin, my hair, my name— spoke too loudly. And as painful as it was, I thought it was normal. I accepted it.

During the Global Read Aloud, so many of you went beyond the book and dove into Pakistani culture. You brought in music. You Skyped with classrooms and people in Pakistan and around the world. You invited local community members to share about the people and the culture of Pakistan. You walked into South Asian markets and clothing stores and bought pomegranates and chadors and did everything you could to bring “over there”— here.

In a world where Pakistan is often equated to dangerous, you helped combat stereotypes. You helped children see the underlying humanity that all people possess which bind us together—because that is the truth. There is no “us versus them”— we are all people.

I’ve read your e-mails and posts. I’ve looked at all your photos and videos. I’ve visited classrooms for school visits and through Skype. I’ve loved the discussions you’ve had with your students on patriarchy, indentured servitude, fairness and justice, and hope.

But you did something else too.

You not only helped children glimpse life in another person’s shoes, you helped children feel seen. You honored them. You validated them. You celebrated them.

When I got the e-mail from Pernille Ripp that AMAL UNBOUND was selected to be part of the global read aloud I was humbled and grateful. What a dream as an author (and a former educator!) that my book would be read by your students. But I could never have imagined just how deeply meaningful and personal this experience would be for me. In honoring your children, the scars from my childhood feel healed.

Regardless of which book you chose, by participating in the Global Read Aloud you opened children’s minds and hearts and connected with the world around us and in doing so you created a whole heaping of empathy that the world can never have enough of. And as the whirlwind six weeks of the Global Read Aloud come to a close, from the bottom of my heart, I  thank you.

With love and gratitude,

Aisha Saeed

 

Sign up for 2019 is open, join us as we once again try to connect the world, one book at a time.

 

 

 

 

Final Video for A Boy Called Bat for Global Read Aloud #GRA18 #GRABat18

With this final video from Elana, the Global Read Aloud is officially over.  Thank you so much to Elana and all the time she has taken in answering our questions. Thank you to all of you who have asked questions, shared your love of the book, and connected with others around the world.

Because of the blog’s limitations, I can only post a link to the video here and not the actual video.  So click the link, please.

TO SEE THE VIDEO, CLICK HERE

Also, if you will be at NCTE, make sure you go see Elana as she speaks and also does a signing for her newest book, Damsel.

WEEK 5 VIDEO FOR A BOY CALLED BAT – ELANA K. ARNOLD ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS #GRABAT18 #GRA18

Another week has passed and as promised, here is Elana’s fifth video. Thank you so much, Elana!  Keep sending her your questions for next week’s video here 

Because of the blog’s limitations, I can only post a link to the video here and not the actual video.  So click the link, please.

TO SEE THE VIDEO, CLICK HERE

Also, if you will be at NCTE, make sure you go see Elana as she speaks and also does a signing for her newest book, Damsel.

WEEK 4 VIDEO FOR A BOY CALLED BAT – ELANA K. ARNOLD ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS #GRABAT18 #GRA18

Another week has passed and as promised, here is Elana’s fourth video. Thank you so much, Elana!  Keep sending her your questions for next week’s video here Because of the blog’s limitations, I can only post a link to the video here and not the actual video.  So click the link, please.

TO SEE THE VIDEO, CLICK HERE

Also, if you will be at NCTE, make sure you go see Elana as she speaks and also does a signing for her newest book, Damsel.